WAR TIME RINGING  (National).

Rnging World Vol 34, Iss 1496, p707,

November 1939

WAR TIME RINGING.
CENTRAL COUNCIL AND MINISTRY OF HOME SECURITY.
AN AGREED STATEMENT.

To the Editor.

Dear Sir,

  Since the early days of the war I have been in touch with the Ministry of Home Security as to ringing in general, and am now able to publish the following agreed notice.

  A copy has been or will be sent to all affiliated associations and all  members of the Council, and I am arranging for a supply to be available for any tower secretary who may desire a copy. In the latter case a stamped addressed envelope will be appreciated.

  All ringers are urged to observe the requirements of the notice and to advise me of any difficulties they may have with the authorities in their district. In this way we shall avoid troubles, help the Ministry and help ourselves.

  I have indicated to the Ministry that we are all prepared to help, and in their last letter they write 'I should like to take this opportunity of expressing our appreciation of the co-operation which you have so kindly offered.'

GEORGE W. FLETCHER,
Hon. Secretary, Central Council.


THE RINGING OF CHURCH BELLS.
CIVIL DEFENCE REGULATIONS.

  Under the provisions of the Control of Noise (Defence) (No. 2) Order, 1939, the sounding of any instrument which might be mistaken by the public for an air raid or poison gas warning signal is, in general, prohibited. The use of church or chapel bells or clock chimes in a customary manner is not, however, considered to be likely to cause confusion, and is not prohibited.

 It is, nevertheless, desirable that arrangements should be made for ringing (whether the bells be in rounds or changes) to cease immediately an air raid warning is given.

 To ensure that the bells stop immediately, a ringer or some other responsible person should be posted outside the tower with means to comnunicate the warning.

  Ringers are reminded that all ringing chambers, bell chambers and staircases are subject to the lighting restrictions, and all lights therein must be adequately screened or, whiere this is not possible, must not be used after sunset or before sunrise.

  The foregoing notice has been approved by the Ministry of Home Security All ringers are urged to observe tbe above requirements in the interest of public security and so that further restrictions may not become necessary.

GEORGE W. FLETCHER,
Hon. Secretary, Central Council.


PEAL RINGING IN WAR TIME.

To the Editor.

Dear Sir,

  The Central Council's resolution of 1915, recalled by Rev. F. Lt. Edwards in 'The Ringing World' for Nov. 10th, regarding abstention from peal ringing during the Great War is interesting, but I hope it will not be taken as a binding precedent to be followed during the present war.

  The attitude of the authorities is quite definitely in favour of the continuance of normal activities, so long as they do not lessen the nation’s war effort. Forms of entertainment and sport have been encouraged as far as possible, and peal ringing, which, together with association meetings, forms the secular side of our art, seems to me to come definitely into this category. It might be argued that it  would not be desirable to start for a peal on the day of the announcement of a big loss to our defence forces — though even that does not stop such things as football matches — but the only other reasons I can see for stopping peal ringing are those which have already in some places stopped or curtailed service ringing. One of the most necessary things at the present time is to keep up the morale of the ordinary population and this will not be done if one’s ordinary means of recreation are cut off.

  Obviously we cannot expect the usual number of peals to be rung — difficulties of travelling and of maintaining bands are often too great, but in places where this can be overcome peal ringing can do no harm to the country.

WILFRID G. WILSON.

End of Articles


PEAL RINGING IN WAR TIME.

To the Editor.

Dear Sir,

  In reply to Mr. Wilson’s letter in your issue of November 24th, the abstention from peal ringing noted and commended by the Central Council in 1915 was not 'total abstinence,' but a marked degree of restraint. Reference to back numbers of your paper at that period will show that reports of a few peals appeared regularly week by week. At the same time there is obvious reason for taking care that peals are not ruug under such conditions as to jar upon the feelings of the public.

  I quite agree that peal ringing on special occasions is to be encouraged. The present month affords notable opportunities. Besides the Christmas festival. Monday, 11th. will be the anniversary of the King's Accession, and Thursday, 14th, the King's birthday.

F. LL . EDWARDS.
 
End of Article

  RW34:1498:0731



November 1939


YORKSHIRE ASSOCIATION (Southern District)
and THE SHEFFIELD AND DISTRICT SOCIETY .

   A joint practice meeting will be held at Ranmoor, Sheffield, on Saturday, November 25th.

  Bells (10) available from 2.30 p.m. until ‘ black-out.’ Short business meeting will be held in the Church Hall immediately afterwards, to be followed by handbells, and also instructional advice on theory and advanced methods by Mr. George Lewis. All welcome. No tea provided, but refreshment obtainable close by. There will be a full moon on this date, therefore no transport difficulties anticipated. Rally up.

Sidney F. Palmer and Maurice E. Wilson, Hon. Secs


End of Article

  RW34:1496:0709

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